Skip to content

A Day Full of Music

January 29, 2011
tags:

I’m heading to a two hour conducting class this morning.  I’m not a choir director, but this opportunity doesn’t come along often and I figure the chances are high that I will eventually be one.  Later on, I’m playing the piano and singing at an anniversary party for my friend’s parents.  I’ll mostly be providing some background music.  Living in an apartment and not wanting to annoy my neighbors, I have had a couple lengthy practice sessions at a friend’s house and at my parents’.  My arm is swollen and painful. 

I spent probably an hour practicing the sections at about 1:45 and 3:04.  As you watch the pianist, notice the movement near her elbow.  Now hold onto your elbow area and wiggle your fingers.  Feel that?  That’s the area I’m talking about.  I should have iced.

Off I go!

Advertisements
4 Comments leave one →
  1. January 29, 2011 10:05 pm

    How long have you been playing the piano? I love to play, but since I’ve moved back to Australia I haven’t had a piano (my mother-in-law somehow “lost” the one I had left in her care when we moved to France…), and I really, really miss it. I play whenever I can, which is all to infrequently.

    Do you play just classical?

  2. January 29, 2011 10:58 pm

    Hi Nicolas! Thanks for stopping by.

    I started piano lessons when I was 5 after I asked my parents for it. I continued for about 7 years and continued learning and practicing on my own, then I started focusing more on singing and less on trying to master songs just for the piano. It has been great being able to accompany myself. I am able to learn songs quickly while my singing non-pianist friends still have to beg for help.

    I like to play jazz too and broadway tunes. I was in a “professional jazz choir” in college (our director always emphasized that we were “professionals” and high school. I read whatever is on the page – I stink at playing improv on the piano, but would love to learn how.

    I went probably at least 6 years without a piano until one was given to me. People try to unload them pretty frequently for various reasons. Keep your eyes open! It’s such a blessing to have a piano in your home. We only have one because it was given to us. Oh yes, I just started teaching piano at people’s homes and I LOVE it. Teaching a little voice too. Wish I had more hours in the day available, but it’s a little tricky with four children. :)

    I hope you are able to get a piano soon.

  3. January 31, 2011 10:01 am

    Thanks for the tips. My problem is that I’m very picky about pianos’ touch and sound. The freebies I have seen have needed so much restoration that it would be cheaper to buy a new one…. Just replacing all the strings is horrendously expensive, and this is usually required for donated pianos.

    Although I much prefer acoustic pianos, I also compose using MIDI, so an electric piano is a good move, but people don’t typically give these away easily :)

    Also, in Australia the musical tradition is very weak. Australians are very avid consumers, but not performers. There aren’t that many piano players around….

    I too was in a choir for a few years, I have loved to sing for as long as I can remember (my parents recorded in their journal that I was singing since I was 2), and this has become a little bit of an issue in sacrament meetings (see http://connault.com.au/2010/01/sources-of-self-worth/).

    I’ve done a bit of piano teaching, but it’s not a very viable main source of income here, people are just not willing to pay much for it. It was fun though, teaching 7- and 77-year-olds :)

  4. January 31, 2011 7:55 pm

    I understand that. I wouldn’t have taken our piano if it sounded horrible or had anything broken on it. We lucked out and a nice couple just wanted to get it out of the way because their son didn’t want to take it with him. They had even had it refurbished.

    I hope you are blessed with something great soon. :)

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: